Marty Schmidt: NZ’s top high altitude climber to speak in Christchurch and Auckland

Maybe you read Marty Schmidt’s remarkable story in the autumn edition of the Climber magazine?

Marty is without a doubt New Zealand’s strongest high altitude climber with five 8000m peaks to his name. In 2010 alone he added Makalu, Gasherbrum 1 and Gasherbrum 2 to his previous tally of Kanchenjunga and Cho Oyu. He has also come very close to summiting a number of others 8000m giants including Everest (two attempts) and K2 (two attempts).

Marty remains relatively unknown in New Zealand, possibly because he hasn’t climbed the only peak that registers with the public these days - Everest! But his ascents of Kanchenjunga and Makalu are in a league of their own and for this reason his presentations in Christchurch and Auckland are not to be missed.

Tickets are now on sale

Christchurch

When: September 23rd, 2011 - 7.30pm

Where: The Cashmere Club, 50 Colombo St.

Tickets: $15 members, $20 non-members

Available: Bivouac Outdoors at Tower Junction, Macpac (Blenheim Rd opposite Tower Junction), The Roxx Climbing Centre and the NZAC National Office, Unit 6,6 Raycroft St, Waltham.


Auckland

When: September 29th 7.30pm.

Where: Auckland University Engineering Building 401-439, Symonds St.

Tickets: $15 members, $20 non-members

Available: Bivouac Outdoors at Queens Street, Sylvia Park and New Market, and Outdoor Action, Albany and at Section evenings.

 

Some of Marty's accomplishments during the past 35 years

1972: Started rock climbing inCa. USA.Climbing the big walls of Yosemite and rock, snow and ice routes of the Sierra Nevada.
1975: Started guiding clients onthe rock faces and with XC skiing/backcountry skiing.
1981-1985: USAF Para-rescueman, stationed in Alaska and toured the world rescuing 14 lives and having 18 assists.
1983: Summited Denali, Alaska 3 times this season, with a new route, the upper Rib and the Cassin. From then till now summited Denali 27 times.
1986: Started to guide Aconcagua, Argentina, till now 32 summits, 5 different routes including the South Face.
Europe, many summits on Elbrus, Mt Blanc, Matterhorn and the Eiger since 1988.
New Zealand’s Aoraki/Mt Cook 19 times, Mt Aspiring 16 times and Mt Tasman 5 times have been keeping me busy since 1988.
1992: On K2 Abruzzi Ridge, sponsored international team. High point was 8,300 meters, no summit.
1994: On Everest, new route NE face, to 8100 meters, with clients, turned because of major rock fall dangers. A week later, went back up with clients on North Ridge, with one client ready for the summit day, we ended up giving away our summit to help in the rescue of Reimburger/Whetu.
Africa, with Kilimanjaro and Mt Kenya since 1997.
Recently been heading to Antarctica with Mt Vinson and to Papua for Carstenze Pyramid.
2000: K2 from the North Ridge, Chinese side. 3.5 months, everyone left the mountain; I soloed to the summit ridge at 8,350 meters, turned around because of 100 mph winds.
2001: On Kangchenjunga SW face,summit. Same year guided the summit of Cho Oyu, no Sherpa’s, no O2 for me, client had half a bottle for the last 200 meters, feet were getting cold. Two days later, made a 10:45 hour ascent of the summit.
2002: Attempt on Cho Oyu, alpine style with client
2004: ChoOyu guided ascent to summit, no O2. Two days later, made a 13 hour solo ascent with all my own ski gear and skied from the summit to the end ofthe snow.
2008: On Everest with a 1 to 1 ratio, SE Ridge, no Sherpas used, also wanted to try without O2. Client intraining now to attempt again.
2009: Cho Oyu with Clif Maloney, one of my clients for over 18 years. We attempted Cho Oyu in 2002, he learned what to do, went home totrain and came to the summit with me in 09. No Sherpa used, Clif on O2. He was the oldest American to summit an 8,000 meter mountain.
2010: Makalu expedition. Initially attempted to open a new route together with Chris Warner, but after Chris went home sick, I soloed to the summit becoming the third Kiwi to do so and the first without supplementary O2.
In July the same year I summited both Gasherbrum1 and 2.